Disaster Risks

Hurricane/High Wind

Female artist outside small studio building cleaning up after a hurricane

Mississippi metalsmith Ann Adele Nettles cleans up after Hurricane Katrina.

What is Your Hurricane Risk?

  • View this U.S. map showing the frequency of hurricane and tropical storm activity
  • Be aware that hurricane season is June-November
  • Be prepared for flooding as well as damaging high winds

Plan for Evacuation or Staying Put

Have the Emergency Essentials Handy

  • Have an emergency supply kit accessible and containing, at minimum:
    • Food and water
    • Flashlight
    • Battery-powered or hand-crank NOAA Weather Radio
    • Extra batteries
    • First aid kit
    • Medications
    • Copies of vital personal and business documents and contacts
    • Extra cash
Carpenter on a ladder outside an artist studio, repairing roof damaged by a hurricane.

Metal artist + beneficiary Kim Eubank’s studio repair of Hurricane Irene damage

What is Your Business Insurance Coverage?

  • Most homeowners or renters insurance policies cover little to none of your artwork, supplies, tools, and other art business assets
  • Even if you have business insurance, a review of the coverage is an important part of being ready for a disaster
  • Homeowners, renters, and business insurance policies exclude losses from floods and earthquakes. Consider flood insurance as part of a hurricane ready plan

Protect Your Assets and Plan for Resilience

A Hurricane-Strong Studio

Windows

Permanent storm shutters are best miniicons5-99

2nd Best Option: Cut 5/8” sheets of marine plywood to fit your windows when needed miniicons5-98

miniicons5-97 Tape does not prevent windows from breaking

Roof

Install straps or additional clips to secure your roof miniicons5-96 miniicons5-99 miniicons5-100

Trees + Shrubs

Keep trees & shrubs close to house well-trimmed

Remove dead & hanging wood

Gutters + Downspouts

Clear clogs

Fix loose gutters & downspouts

Plan to Communicate. Communicate to Plan

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