Get Organized

“Clean up is a marathon, not a sprint!” Alison Rusza, Glass Artist, CERF+ Grantee

“Clean up is a marathon, not a sprint!” Alison Rusza, Glass Artist, CERF+ Beneficiary

To function more effectively, take time to get organized.
  • Remember that the shock and stress of an emergency will reduce your normal mental capacity.
  • DO NOT WORK ALONE—you need a “disaster comrade” to help you through decision-making and the physical demands of the clean-up and salvage process.

 

 

 

After a Minor Disaster (limited damage to your work/storage space)

FIRST STEPS:

1. Isolate/secure the affected area.

2. Locate the source of the problem and stop it if this safe to do (if you know how, turn off electricity/gas/water; otherwise, call your utility companies.)

3. Get rid of major hazards: contact emergency service workers to deal with structural, electrical and chemical or other threats to health and safety.

4. Assess health and safety risks; get protective gear

5. Conduct a damage assessment and notify your insurance agent, building owner, etc.


SECOND STEPS:

1. Identify needs for outside assistance, and notify, as necessary: Needs an Expert Financial Investment

Hazardous waste contractor

Service workers or providers

Volunteers

2. Prevent further damage

3. Make a triage plan:

What can stay in place (with or without protection)?

What is unsalvageable and should be disposed of?

What needs to be moved to a secure, dry area?

Where will your “triage area” be?

4. Assemble useful equipment and supplies.

After a Major Disaster (extensive damage to your work/storage space, building, and environs)

Depending on the nature of the disaster, the need for evacuation, and when you get clearance from emergency authorities to re-enter your building, you may have to address the First Steps below from an off-site location. While you wait, you can also prepare for the Second Steps.


FIRST STEPS:

1. Alert your insurance agent Needs an Expert 

2. If it’s safe to do so AND you know how, turn off electricity/gas/water. Otherwise, call your utility company.

3. Get rid of major hazards. Contact emergency service workers to deal with structural, electrical and chemical or other threats to health and safety.


SECOND STEPS:

1. Assess health and safety risks

2. Get protective gear and useful supplies and equipment

3. Identify needs for outside assistance, and notify, as necessary: Needs an Expert Financial Investment

Hazardous waste contractor

Service workers or providers

Volunteers


THIRD STEPS:

1. Assess, document, and report damage

2. Prevent further damage

3. Make a triage plan:

What can stay in place (with or without protection)?

What is unsalvageable and should be disposed of?

What needs to be moved to a secure, dry area?

Where will your “triage area” be?

Where should you locate a first aid station/rest area

4. Purchase more supplies as needed.

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